By Injury Location

We have physiotherapists and osteopaths who specialise in certain areas of the body. Please click on the links to learn about common causes of pain in specific part of the body and what physiotherapy and osteopathy treatment involves.​

Please note that although the advice and exercises provided are designed to assist your recovery they are not a replacement for seeing a Physiotherapist or Osteopath. It is essential that you ALWAYS make sure you see your Doctor, Osteopath or Chartered Physiotherapist beforehand to diagnose your injury and guide you through recovery.

    Common Injuries

  • Clicking ankles or feet

    Clicking or crunching in the ankles or feet can be caused by a number of things. Most people fear that the clicking is caused by bone hitting bone. However, thankfully nowadays this is rare. If you have this, it is likely that for many years you have been suffering severe...

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  • Post-Operative Foot / Ankle

    Our feet take a pounding in our lives and wearing poor footwear, incorrect leg alignment, weaknesses further up the leg back and pelvis and inefficient sporting technique can increase the chance of developing problems in that part of the body. Foot posture changes with age, like the rest of your...

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  • Tennis Elbow

    This is an irritation of the tendon that runs over the bony bit of the elbow. The pain comes on slowly often after the aggravating activity at first. As it becomes more severe the pain then starts to be experienced during the aggravating activity. The aggravating activities include tennis, squash...

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  • Stiff Thoracic Spine

    The thoracic spine – middle and upper part of the back - is the stiffest part of the spine due to the ribs attaching here, but it commonly becomes too stiff as a result of poor postures. Please click here to learn correct sitting posture. Thoracic spine stiffness puts more...

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  • Neck Pain/Tightness

    Mild neck pain and/or tightness that comes on slowly is commonly due to the upper back rounding forwards and the chin pointing forwards and upwards, which increases muscle and nerve tension and may cause pins and needles or pain in the arms and hands. Sometimes, breathing becomes restricted due to...

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  • Patello-Femoral Joint Pain (knee cap pain)

    Patello-femoral pain syndrome is sometimes referred to as Anterior knee Pain. Anterior is the medical word for the front of, which is why the term anterior knee pain in itself is not a diagnosis. It is in fact an umbrella term that covers a number of diagnoses, one of which...

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  • How to find pelvic neutral

    Please click here to learn how the back works before reading the following. Do not do the following if you have any back pain- you must see a Physiotherapist or Osteopath for a full assessment, diagnosis and guidance through the exercise. Please click on the link to learn how to...

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  • ITB and TFL release

    Please click here to read how the knee works before reading the following.

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  • Breathing and relaxation training

    Many spinal, hip and shoulder problems can be helped by retraining breathing habits and releasing the structures involved in breathing, such as the diaphragm and thoracic spine.

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  • Dynamic stretching

    Dynamic stretching involves taking the muscles, joints, nerves and fascia through the ranges of movement necessary for the particular exercise you are planning to do, slowly building speed as you repeat the movements.There is not a set amount of time or reps for dynamic stretching – it depends on the...

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  • Glut/ VMO/ leg alignment exercise

    Please click here to read 'how the knee works' before reading the following. This exercise trains the lateral glute muscle fibres, lower limb alignment, VMO (the inside part of the quads muscle) and stretches the calf so is a big hitter – if you can get it right! You will...

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  • Train deep core muscles

    The following exercise should be performed under the guidance of your Physiotherapist or Osteopath to ensure you are doing it correctly and prevent aggravation of your condition. Please click here to learn how the back works before reading the following.

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About Your Injury

Hover over the specific body parts and find out more

Use your mouse to hover over the dark grey dots and click through to the specific body parts to get advice about your injury.

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